Category Archive for 'Understanding Nature'

Birdsong has evolved over immense periods of time, and with Australia’s Robins, you can hear that evolution in the songs these birds sing today. Where we live in southern Australia, there are four closely related, ‘red-breasted’, Robin species (note these are Australian Robins of the Petroicidae family – unrelated to the European or American Robins): […]

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Birdsongs often sound like simple, twittery noises to our ears, but what do birds hear? It is difficult to know of course, but the first thing you notice when you listen closely to birdsong is that is often incredibly complex. Tweet

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We’ve just had a succession of 40 degree days. I’m talking Celsius (that’s over 100 degrees Fahrenheit), and yes, I’m writing from the Southern Hemisphere – Australia. The cicadas have begun singing in the eucalypt forests around us, and the other morning I put my microphones out for a few hours to capture their choruses. […]

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Birds don’t just make sounds by singing, they use mechanical and ‘body sounds’ to communicate too. ‘Bill-clicking’ is a widespread behaviour, and is sometimes combined with normal vocalising, as with the flock calls of White-winged Choughs, where a bill-click subtlely precedes a mournful descending whistle (listen for it on track 11 of our ‘A Morning […]

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Frog choruses are very appealing, and make some of the most musical of nature recordings. Which is odd in a way, because frogs have very little vocal expression. Sure, they make great noises, but they are unable to modify their vocalisations or express feeling in the way that mammals or even birds are able to. […]

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Every two years, the Australian Wildlife Sound Recording Group gathers for a workshop, and in October of 2007 we met for a week of talks and social events, on a bush property near Mount Walsh National Park in SE Queensland. Many in the group are amateur nature recordists, and together we are an odd mob, […]

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